Autism Testing near DFW**

**Additional Tests Available Upon Request

 

Dallas/Fort worth customers: Are you having difficulty getting an appointment with a local a psychologist that can do Autism testing without a long waitlist or have you found that many Psychologists in your area only take cash pay clients or don't accept your insurance, then we have a solution for you. At Kranz Psychological Services we service the Dallas Fort worth overflow clients and we accept most insurance providers and Medicaid clients and can get you in for an autism evaluation in less than a months time typically.

Kranz Psycholigical Services is located in Longview Texas just 2 hours east of the metroplex on Interstate 20 and is an easy alternative.

 

We accept both cash pay and insurance clients including Medicaid clients.

A typical cash pay Autism evaluation would normally cost $1200.

We also accept insurance from the following providers:

Aetna

Amerigroup (Medicaid)

Beacon

Blue Cross/Blue Shield - PPO, HMO, Health Select

Superior CHIP

Christus Health Plan

Cigna (Private)
Cigna Healthspring

Magellan (mental health subsidiary of Blue Cross HMO)

Medicare

Molina (Medicaid)

MultiPlan/PHCS

Superior (Medicaid)

Texas Children’s Health Plan (Medicaid)

Traditional Texas Medicaid

TriCare East (non-network)

TriWest (VA referral)

United HealthCare (Private) - UMR, All Savers

United Healthcare Community Services (Medicaid)

Autism Spectrum Testing

What tests do we use:

Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule, Second Edition (ADOS-2):

Do you have concerns that you or your child may be on the autism spectrum? An ADOS-2 (Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule, 2nd Edition) assessment is a logical next step. The ADOS-2 is considered the “gold standard” for observational assessment of autism spectrum disorders, the ADOS-2 can be used to evaluate almost anyone suspected of having ASD - from 12-month-olds with no speech to adults who are verbally fluent. Areas assessed include communication, social interaction, play, and restricted and repetitive behaviors. For children, the ADOS-2 incorporates a variety of fun toys and activities used to make the diagnosis so the child feels like the test is fun.

Sensory Profile-2:

The sensory profile provides a method of evaluating a child or adult’s sensory processing patterns in the context of everyday life.  The instrument examines the sensory systems (general, auditory, visual, touch, movement, body position, and oral), behavioral issues associated with sensory issues (behavioral, conduct, social/emotional, and attentional), and provides information about sensory patterns (seeking/seeker, avoiding/avoider, sensitivity/sensor, and registrative/bystander).

Sensory Processing Measure-2:

Sensory Processing Measure, Second Edition (SPM-2): The Sensory Processing Measure, Second Edition is a measure of function in the visual, auditory, tactile, olfactory, gustatory, proprioceptive (body awareness), and vestibular (balance and motion) sensory systems, as well as praxis and social participation. The SPM-2 is comprised of 12 main forms and provides an overview of a client’s sensory functioning across multiple environments and raters.

Childhood Autism Rating Scale, Second Edition (CARS2ST and CARS2QPC):

 

The CARS2 helps to identify children with autism. More specifically, the CARS2 is designed to distinguish children who are on the autism spectrum from developmentally delayed children who are not on the spectrum. The instrument is responsive to individuals on the "high functioning" end of the autism spectrum (average or higher IQ scores, better verbal skills, and subtler social and behavioral deficits), and it helps distinguishes between mild-to-moderate and severe autism.  

 

Social Responsiveness Scale - 2 (SRS-2):

The SRS-2 is based on parent report and identifies social impairment associated with ASD and quantifies its severity. Sensitive enough to detect even subtle symptoms but specific enough to differentiate clinical groups, the SRS-2 can be used to monitor symptoms throughout the life span.

Gilliam Asperger’s Disorder Scale (GADS):

The GADS rating scale is used for the assessment of individuals ages 3 through 22 who present unique behavioral problems. Its purpose is to help professionals diagnose Asperger’s Disorder. 

Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder Tests can be Administered with Autism Tests

 

National Institute for Children’s Health Quality Vanderbilt Scales Assessment Scale (NICHQ): 

 

The NICHQ is useful tool for diagnosing ADHD in children. The instrument also screens for conduct disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, anxiety, and depression. There are forms available for both teachers and caregivers to complete, and there is a Spanish-language version available. The initial scales identify the symptoms that are present. The second section of the instrument contains a set of performance measures. The presence of symptoms is not sufficient for a diagnosis. In other words, there must be impairment in functioning to meet the diagnostic criteria.

 

Conners Continuous Performance Test – Third Edition (Conners CPT3):

The Conners CPT3 is a task-oriented, computerized assessment of attention related problems. The child is asked to respond when any letter except “X” appears on the screen. The Conners CPT3 can help pinpoint the exact nature of the child’s suspected attention deficits by looking at performance in four different aspects of attention: inattentiveness, impulsivity, sustained attention, and vigilance.

 

Conners Kiddie Continuous Performance Test – Second Edition (Conners K-CPT2):

 

Conners Kiddie Continuous Performance Test – Second Edition (Conners K-CPT 2): The Conners K-CPT 2 is a task-oriented, computerized assessment of attention related problems. The child is asked to respond when any picture, except a ball, appears on the screen. The Conners K-CPT 2 can help pinpoint the exact nature of the child’s suspected attention deficits by looking at performance in four different aspects of attention: inattentiveness, impulsivity, sustained attention, and vigilance.

ttitudes and behaviors assessed include expectations of children, parental empathy towards children’s needs, use of corporal punishment, parent-child family roles, and children’s power and independence.