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Want to Know More About Evaluations?

Neurological/Memory (Adult)

  • A neurological or memory evaluation is typically given when there is suspected decline in memory functioning (possibly due to traumatic brain injury or disease). Such a battery of tests can be given to establish a baseline for the client’s functioning, as well as to document the level of decline at regular intervals.

  • Assessment Procedures

    • Clinical Interview/Mental Status

    • Wechsler Adult Intelligence Test – Fourth Edition

    • Wide Range Achievement Test – 5th Edition 

    • Wechsler Memory Scale – Fourth Edition 

    • Saint Louis University Mental Status Examination

    • The Trail Making Test (A and B)

    • Bender-Gestalt Test

    • Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Functioning 

    • Personality Assessment Inventor​

 

Intellectual/Academic (Child & Adult)

 

  • Formal intelligence tests are usually given as part of a broader battery of tests when some sort of problem is suspected. Children may present with delayed developmental milestones. Alternatively, children may perform unusually poorly in one or more subjects, despite seemingly normal intelligence. Standardized intelligence testing is the primary tool for identifying individuals with intellectual disabilities. When the results of standardized intelligence testing are compared with the results of a measure of academic achievement, it is possible to identify the academic strengths and weaknesses of a student, inform decisions regarding  eligibility for educational services/placement, or provide evidence for diagnosis of a specific learning disability.

  • Assessment Procedures

    • Clinical Interview/Mental Status

    • Developmental Assessment of Young Children - Second Edition

    • Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development - Fourth Edition

    • Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence – Fourth Edition

    • Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children – Fifth Edition

    • Wechsler Individual Achievement Test – Third Edition (WIAT-III)

    • National Institute for Children’s Health Quality Vanderbilt Scales Assessment Scale (NICHQ)​

 

ADHD (Child & Adult)

  • The CDC estimates that up to 11% of children have ADHD. In fact, it is the most commonly diagnosed behavioral disorder in children under the age of 18. There are many online checklists available for parents to fill out that can give an indication of whether or not a child has ADHD. However, it is important to note that there are several other conditions that are often misdiagnosed as ADHD including: trauma responses, mood disorders, sensory processing disorder, autism, hearing problems, or even a lack of maturity. In order to be responsible, a practitioner often must “rule out” the presence of other difficulties.

  • Assessment Procedures 

    • Clinical Interview/Mental Status

    • Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence – Fourth Edition 

    • Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children – Fifth Edition

    • Sensory Profile 2

    • Adolescent Psychopathology Scale 

    • National Institute for Children’s Health Quality Vanderbilt Scales Assessment Scale 

    • Beck Youth Inventory - 2 

    • Behavior Assessment System for Children, Parent Rating Scales, Third Edition 

    • Behavior Assessment System for Children, Self-Report Form, Third Edition 

    • Behavior Assessment System for Children, Parenting Relationship Questionnaire (BASC3, PRQ)

    • Conners Continuous Performance Test – Third Edition (Conners CPT3)

    • Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Functioning – Adult 

    • Adult ADHD Checklist

    • The Trail Making Test (A and B)

 

Autism Spectrum Disorder (Child & Adult) - Includes the ADOS-2   

  • There is presently no medical test that can diagnose a child with autism. Autism is considered a “spectrum” disorder. In other words, the presentation can be vastly different from child to child. Often, the first signs may be a lack or eye contact or playing with a toy in strange or repetitive ways. Early diagnosis and intervention gives a child the best chance at both short-term success (academic and social skills) and long-term independence

  • Assessment Procedures

    • Clinical Interview/Mental Status

    • Developmental Assessment of Young Children - Second Edition

    • Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development - Fourth Edition

    • Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence – Fourth Edition

    • Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children – Fifth Edition

    • Wechsler Adult-Intelligence Scale – Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV)

    • Comprehensive Test of Nonverbal Intelligence-Second Edition (CTONI-2)

    • Sensory Profile 2

    • National Institute for Children’s Health Quality Vanderbilt Scales Assessment Scale 

    • Behavior Assessment System for Children, Parent Rating Scales, Third Edition 

    • Behavior Assessment System for Children, Self-Report Form, Third Edition 

    • Behavior Assessment System for Children, Parenting Relationship Questionnaire 

    • Childhood Autism Rating Scale, Second Edition 

    • Gilliam Asperger's Disorder Scale

    • Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule, Second Edition

    • Social Responsiveness Scale - 2 

 

Emotional Functioning/Personality Functioning (Adult)

    

  • The purpose of a general psychological evaluation is to provide the client a deeper understanding of himself/herself. At times, the results of such an evaluation are used to make complex and life-altering decisions. The end goal is to synthesize an assortment of assessment techniques so that recommendations can be made for the client’s benefit. A psychological evaluation has both depth (the forms of assessment used reflect the intensity of the issue being examined) and breadth (the methods of assessment are multiple to ensure that the examiner has done everything necessary to thoroughly assess the issue being examined).

  • Assessment Procedures

    • Clinical Interview/Mental Status Exam

    • Wechsler Adult-Intelligence Scale – Fourth Edition

    • Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test – 2 

    • Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI)

    • Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory - IV

    • Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory

 

Trauma/Foster Care Evaluation (Child) 

  • Trauma is defined by the American Psychological Association (APA) as the emotional response someone has to an extremely negative event. At times, the impact of that event is severe enough to interfere with an individual’s ability to live a normal life. In such cases, help may be needed to process the event. While many sources of trauma are physically violent in nature, others are psychological. Some common sources of trauma include: 

    • Neglect

    • Abuse

    • Domestic violence

    • Natural disasters

    • Severe illness or injury

    • The death of a loved one

    • Witnessing an act of violence

  • Young children, including those who are in FPS care, are especially vulnerable to trauma and should be psychologically examined after a traumatic event has occurred to ensure their emotional well-being.

  • Assessment Procedures 

    • Clinical Interview/Mental Status

    • Developmental Assessemnt of Young Children - Second Edition

    • Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Developemnt

    • Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence – Fourth Edition

    • Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children – Fifth Edition

    • Sensory Profile 2

    • Adolescent Psychopathology Scale

    • Child Sexual Behavior Inventory

    • Trauma Symptoms Checklist for Children

    • Trauma Symptoms Checklist for Young Children

    • National Institute for Children’s Health Quality Vanderbilt Scales Assessment Scale 

    • Behavior Assessment System for Children, Self-Report Form, Third Edition 

    • Behavior Assessment System for Children, Parenting Relationship Questionnaire

    • Beck Youth Inventory - 2

 

Parenting (Adult or Adolescent) 

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  • The foundation for a parenting evaluation is a general psychological evaluation. However, the parenting evaluation also assesses an additional dimension: the client’s ability to parent. Such an evaluation would typically be completed to comply with a court order or meet FPS requirements. However, the results are not intended to be used for the purposes of custody decisions well-being.

  • Assessment Procedures 

    • Clinical Interview/Mental Status

    • Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test - Second Edition

    • Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development

    • Personality Assessment Inventory

    • Child Abuse Potential Inventory

    • Adult/Adolescent Parenting Inventory

 

Frequently Asked Questions

Q: Why is mental health so expensive?

A: For a standard psychological evaluation, it takes at least 8 hours of time to conduct the interview, complete testing instruments, and analyze all of the information. Some types of evaluations are even longer. The testing and assessments generate anywhere between 85 and 160 pages of data - it takes time, training, and skill to understand how to interpret the information. It also takes time to type up a 15 to 25 page report! When broken down by cost per hour, a psychologist often charges less than your auto mechanic or painter. How much more important is your mental health or your child's mental health?

Q: What is the process of a psychological evaluation?

A: Step 1 - You will provide your name, DOB, your child's name and DOB (if needed), and a copy of the front and back of your insurance card. Our office manager will check your benefits and let you know what percentage of the visit (copay or coinsurance) is your responsibility. 

     Step 2 - Some insurances require an initial visit so that services can be authorized. This initial interview will take approximately one hour. Our office manager will call you as soon as services are approved to schedule your second appointment.

     Step 3 - On your second visit, you will complete some testing. If your insurance did not require an initial visit, you will also complete a one hour interview at this time. While you are in the office, you will also fill out several assessments and rating scales. Thanks to modern technology, some of the assessments and rating scales can be done prior to the visit if you have an email address and internet access! It also tends to be less stressful for teenagers and children when they can complete paperwork at home in their own environment.

     Step 4 - After all of the information and testing have been gathered, we analyze and synthesize the information to come up with diagnostic impressions and recommendations.

     Step 5 - You will come back for a follow up appointment to get the results. You will be given a copy of the report. Feel free to ask as many questions as you want! 

Q: How long does it take to get results?

A: Typically, results are ready one to two weeks from your visit and sometimes even faster.

Q: Are your costs negotiable?

A: Cash pay rates are available if we are unable to take your insurance or you prefer for us not to file a claim. Click here for current insurance information.

Q: What is the difference between a psychologist and a counselor?

A: A counselor is trained to provide counseling services. A psychologist is trained to provide counseling services and psychological evaluations.

Q: What is the difference between a psychologist and a psychiatrist?

A: A psychiatrist is a medical doctor who can prescribe medication. A psychologist cannot write a prescription for you.

Q: What tests do you have available?

A: Take a look here. 

 
 
 
 
 
 
 

​© 2017 by Kranz Psychological Services, PLLC