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**Additional Tests Available Upon Request

 

Clinical Interview and Mental Status Exam: A clinical interview is designed to allow the examiner gather information about the client directly from the client. This unstructured format allows the examiner to ask specific questions to assist in diagnosing the client and to provide specific recommendations. As a part of a clinical interview, the examiner also completes a Mental Status Exam. The mental status exam is a structured method of obtaining information about a client’s appearance, attitude, behavior, current mood, speech, thought processes and content, and orientation.

 

Developmental/Intelligence

Developmental Assessment of Young Children, Second Edition (DAYC-2):

 

The DAYC-2 is used to identify children birth through five years with possible delays in the following domains: cognition, communication, social-emotional development, physical development, and adaptive behavior. Each of the five domains reflects an area mandated for assessment and intervention for young children in IDEA.

Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development - Fourth Edition (Bayley 4): 

 

The Bayley-4 assesses infant and toddler development across five scales: Cognitive, Language, Motor, Social–Emotional, and Adaptive Behavior. Assessment of the Cognitive, Language, and Motor domains is accomplished by administering structured items to the child, and engaging the caregiver to support responses where appropriate. The Social-Emotional and Adaptive Behavior scales are administered via caregiver questionnaire which allows them to share their own observations of the child’s abilities.

 

Wechsler Preschool and Primary Scale of Intelligence – Fourth Edition (WPPSI-IV):

The WPPSI-IV is an individually administered measure of cognitive development in children between the ages of 2.5 and 7. The instrument yields a Full-Scale IQ score as well as three or five index scores (depending on age): A Verbal Comprehension Index, a Visual Spatial Index, a Working Memory Index, a Fluid Reasoning Index, and a Processing Speed Index. The Verbal Comprehension Index (VCI) is designed to measure verbal reasoning and concept formation. The Visual Spatial Index (VSI) measures the ability to manipulate mental images and solve mental problems. The Fluid Reasoning Index (FRI) is a measure of the ability to reason and to solve new problems independently of previously acquired knowledge. The ability to sustain attention, concentrate, and exert mental control is measured by the Working Memory Index (WMI). The Processing Speed Index (PSI) is designed to measure the ability to process simple or routine visual material without making errors.

 

Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children – Fifth Edition (WISC-V):  The WISC-V is an individually administered measure of cognitive development in children between the ages of 6 and 16. The 10 administered subtests yield a Full-Scale IQ as well as five index scores: A Verbal Comprehension Index, a Visual Spatial Index, a Working Memory Index, a Fluid Reasoning Index, and a Processing Speed Index. The Verbal Comprehension Index (VCI) is designed to measure verbal reasoning and concept formation. The Visual Spatial Index (VSI) measures the ability to manipulate mental images and solve mental problems. The Fluid Reasoning Index (FRI) is a measure of the ability to reason and to solve new problems independently of previously acquired knowledge. The ability to sustain attention, concentrate, and exert mental control is measured by the Working Memory Index (WMI). The Processing Speed Index (PSI) is designed to measure the ability to process simple or routine visual material without making errors.

 

Wechsler Adult-Intelligence Scale – Fourth Edition (WAIS-IV):

 

The WAIS-IV is an individually administered measure of cognitive development for individuals ages 16 to 90. The instrument yields a  Full-Scale IQ as well as four index scores: A Verbal Comprehension Index, a Perceptual Reasoning Index, Working Memory Index, and a Processing Speed Index. The Verbal Comprehension Index (VCI) is designed to measure verbal reasoning abilities and concept formation. The Perceptual Reasoning Index (PRI) is designed to measure fluid reasoning in the perceptual domain with tasks that assess nonverbal concept formation, visual perception and organization, visual-motor coordination, learning, and the ability to separate figure and ground in visual stimuli. The Working Memory Index (WMI) measures her ability to sustain attention, concentrate, and exert mental control. The ability to process simple or routine visual material without making errors is measured by the Processing Speed Index (PSI).

 

Comprehensive Test of Nonverbal Intelligence-Second Edition (CTONI-2):

 

The CTONI–2 is uses a nonverbal format to measure general intelligence of children and adults whose performance on traditional tests might be adversely affected by subtle or overt impairments involving language or motor abilities. It measures analogical reasoning, categorical classification, and sequential reasoning, using six subtests in two different contexts: Pictures of familiar objects (e.g., people, toys, animals) and geometric designs (unfamiliar sketches and drawings).

 

Kaufman Brief Intelligence Test – 2 (KBIT-2): 

 

The K-BIT-2 is a brief, individually administered measure of verbal and nonverbal intelligence in  individuals between the ages of 4 and 90. The instrument yields a Full-Scale IQ, as well as verbal and non-verbal scores.

 

Academic Achievement

Wide Range Achievement Test -- Fifth Edition (WRAT5): 

The WRAT5 provides an accurate and easy-to-administer way to assess academic achievement in people ages 5 and up. The WRAT5 includes four subtests: Word Reading, Spelling, Math Computations, and Sentence Comprehension. A Reading Composite which combines the Sentence Comprehension and Word Reading subtests score is also included.

 

Wechsler Individual Achievement Test – Third Edition (WIAT-III):

The WIAT-III is an individually administered measure of academic achievement for individuals between the ages of 4 and 50. Composite scores provided by the measure include: Oral Language, Total Reading, Basic Reading, Reading Comprehension and Fluency, Written Expression, Mathematics, and Math Fluency. The composite scores are generated through the administration of 16 subtests: listening comprehension, reading comprehension, math problem solving, sentence composition, word reading, essay composition, pseudoword decoding, numerical operations, oral expression, oral reading fluency, and math fluency (addition, subtraction, multiplication).

Autism Spectrum

Sensory Profile-2:

The sensory profile provides a method of evaluating a child or adult’s sensory processing patterns in the context of everyday life.  The instrument examines the sensory systems (general, auditory, visual, touch, movement, body position, and oral), behavioral issues associated with sensory issues (behavioral, conduct, social/emotional, and attentional), and provides information about sensory patterns (seeking/seeker, avoiding/avoider, sensitivity/sensor, and registrative/bystander).

Childhood Autism Rating Scale, Second Edition (CARS2ST and CARS2QPC):

 

The CARS2 helps to identify children with autism. More specifically, the CARS2 is designed to distinguish children who are on the autism spectrum from developmentally delayed children who are not on the spectrum. The instrument is responsive to individuals on the "high functioning" end of the autism spectrum (average or higher IQ scores, better verbal skills, and subtler social and behavioral deficits), and it helps distinguishes between mild-to-moderate and severe autism.  

 

Autism Diagnostic Observation Schedule, Second Edition (ADOS-2):

 

Considered the “gold standard” for observational assessment of autism spectrum disorders, the ADOS-2 can be used to evaluate almost anyone suspected of having ASD - from 12-month-olds with no speech to adults who are verbally fluent. Areas assessed include communication, social interaction, play, and restricted and repetitive behaviors.

Social Responsiveness Scale - 2 (SRS-2):

The SRS-2 is based on parent report and identifies social impairment associated with ASD and quantifies its severity. Sensitive enough to detect even subtle symptoms but specific enough to differentiate clinical groups, the SRS-2 can be used to monitor symptoms throughout the life span.

Gilliam Asperger’s Disorder Scale (GADS):

 

The GADS rating scale is used for the assessment of individuals ages 3 through 22 who present unique behavioral problems. Its purpose is to help professionals diagnose Asperger’s Disorder. 

 

 

Emotional/Behavioral/Personality Functioning for Children and Adolescents

Beck Youth Inventory -2 (BYI-2)

The BYI-2 is a self-report measure for children ages 7 to 18. The questions assess depression, anxiety, self-concept, andger, and disruptive behavior.

 

Behavior Assessment System for Children, Parent Rating Scales, Third Edition (BASC3, PRS): 

The BASC3 PRS offers a comprehensive system for identifying, evaluating, monitoring, and remediating behavioral and emotional problems in children and adolescents. The instrument can be used with individuals ages between the ages of 2 and 25. The instrument contains scales for evaluating a wide range of adaptive skills, behavioral symptoms, externalizing problems, internalizing problems, and school problems. The clinical index scores also indicate the probability of the existence of ADHD, Autism, and clinical issues. Data is gathered directly from the parent on the parent version of the instrument.

 

Behavior Assessment System for Children, Self-Report Form, Third Edition (BASC3, SRP): 

 

The BASC3 SRP offers a comprehensive system for identifying, evaluating, monitoring, and remediating behavioral and emotional problems in children and adolescents. The instrument can be used with individuals ages between the ages of 8 and 25. The instrument contains scales for evaluating a wide range of adaptive skills, behavioral symptoms, externalizing problems, internalizing problems, and school problems. The clinical index scores also indicate the probability of the existence of ADHD, Autism, and clinical issues. Data is gathered directly from the child or adolescent in the self-report version of the instrument.

 

Behavior Assessment System for Children, Parenting Relationship Questionnaire (BASC3, PRQ):

 

The BASC3, PRQ is designed to capture a parent's perspective on the parent-child relationship. Items assessed include attachment (closeness of bond between parent and child), parent/ child communication, parental discipline practices (consistence of responses to a child’s misbehavior), involvement (participation in common activities as well as the parent’s knowledge about the child’s activities), parenting confidence (comfort, control, and confidence of the parent when actively involved in the parenting), satisfaction with school (the degree to which the parent believes the school meets the child’s needs), and relational frustration (parent distress or frustration in interactions with the child).

 

Adolescent Psychopathology Scale (APS):

The APS is used with individuals aged 12 to 21 and measures 20 different clinical disorders, 5 personality disorders, and 11 psychosocial problem content areas. There are also validity scales that assess the consistency of responses, as well as a tendency to underreport or overreport symptoms.

Personality Assessment Inventory - Adolescent (PAI-A):

The PAI-A is an objective test of personality and emotional functioning. The PAI has four validity scales (inconsistency, infrequency, negative impression, and positive impression), 11 clinical scales (somatic complaints, anxiety, anxiety-related disorders, depression, mania, paranoia, schizophrenia, borderline features, antisocial features, alcohol problems, and drug problems), 5 treatment consideration scales (aggression, suicidal ideation, stress, nonsupport, and treatment rejection), and 2 interpersonal scales (dominance and warmth).

Millon Adolescent Clinical Inventory - Second Edition (MACI-II):

The MACI-II helps practitioners from a variety of settings assess personality patterns, expressed concerns, and clinical symptoms while its therapeutic focus will assist in making reliable diagnostic and treatment decisions.

Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory - Adolescent (MMPI-A):

The MMPI-A is an empirically based measure of adolescent psychopathology, the MMPI-A test contains adolescent-specific scales, and other unique features designed to make the instrument especially appropriate for today’s youth. Offering reports tailored to particular settings, the MMPI-A test helps provide relevant information to aid in problem identification, diagnosis, and treatment planning for youth (ages 14–18).

Emotional/Behavioral/Personality Functioning for Adults

Personality Assessment Inventory (PAI):

The PAI is an objective test of personality and emotional functioning. The PAI has four validity scales (inconsistency, infrequency, negative impression, and positive impression), 11 clinical scales (somatic complaints, anxiety, anxiety-related disorders, depression, mania, paranoia, schizophrenia, borderline features, antisocial features, alcohol problems, and drug problems), 5 treatment consideration scales (aggression, suicidal ideation, stress, nonsupport, and treatment rejection), and 2 interpersonal scales (dominance and warmth).

Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory - Adolescent Clinical Inventory - Fourth Edition (MCMI-IV):

The MCMI-IV is a widely used test of emotional and personality functinoing in adults. The MCMI-IV assessment can be used in multiple settings, including clinical and counseling, medical, government, and forensic. 

Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory - Second Edition (MMPI-II):

The MMPI-II is the most widely used and widely researched test of adult psychopathology. Used by clinicians to assist with the diagnosis of mental disorders and the selection of appropriate treatment methods, the MMPI-2 test continues to help meet the assessment needs of mental health professionals in an ever-changing environment.

NEO Five Factory Inventory - Third Edition (NEO FFI-3):

The NEO-FFI-3 provides a quick, reliable, and accurate measure of the five domains of personality (Neuroticism, Extraversion, Openness, Agreeableness, and Conscientiousness).

Trauma

Adverse Childhood Experiences Checklist (ACE Checklist):

Our ACE Checklist is adapted from the CDC-Kaiser Permanente ACE Study conducted in 1998. There is a clear link between childhood trauma and the chronic diseases people develop as adults, as well as social and emotional problems.

Trauma Symptoms Checklist for Children (TSCC):

The TSCC evaluates posttraumatic symptoms in children ages 8 to 17, including the effects of child abuse (sexual, physical, and psychological) and neglect. The scale measures not only posttraumatic stress, but also other symptom clusters found in some traumatized children.

Trauma Symptoms Checklist for Young Children (TSCYC):

 

The TSCYC is completed by a caregiver and evaluates posttraumatic symptoms in children between the ages of 3 and 7, including the effects of child abuse (sexual, physical, and psychological) and neglect. The scale measures not only posttraumatic stress, but also other symptom clusters found in some traumatized children.

Child Sexual Behavior Inventory (CSBI):

 

The CSBI is completed by a caregiver and measures sexual behavior in children ages 2-12 years when there is a suspicion or confirmation that the child has been sexually abused. The CSBI assesses a wide range of sexual behaviors that cover nine major content domains: boundary issues, sexual interest, exhibitionism, sexual intrusiveness, gender role behavior, sexual knowledge, self-stimulation, voyeuristic behavior, and sexual anxiety.

Attention Deficit/Hyperactivity Disorder

 

National Institute for Children’s Health Quality Vanderbilt Scales Assessment Scale (NICHQ): 

 

The NICHQ is useful tool for diagnosing ADHD in children. The instrument also screens for conduct disorder, oppositional defiant disorder, anxiety, and depression. There are forms available for both teachers and caregivers to complete, and there is a Spanish-language version available. The initial scales identify the symptoms that are present. The second section of the instrument contains a set of performance measures. The presence of symptoms is not sufficient for a diagnosis. In other words, there must be impairment in functioning to meet the diagnostic criteria.

 

Conners Continuous Performance Test – Third Edition (Conners CPT3):

The Conners CPT3 is a task-oriented, computerized assessment of attention related problems. The child is asked to respond when any letter except “X” appears on the screen. The Conners CPT3 can help pinpoint the exact nature of the child’s suspected attention deficits by looking at performance in four different aspects of attention: inattentiveness, impulsivity, sustained attention, and vigilance.

 

Neurocognitive/Memory Functioning  

Wechsler Memory Scale – Fourth Edition (WMS-IV):

 

The WMS-IV is an individually administered test of memory for individuals 16 years of age and older. The 10 administered subtests assess auditory memory, visual memory, visual working memory, immediate memory, and delayed memory.

 

Trail Making Test: 

 

The Trail Making Test (A and B) is widely used as a test of visual-conceptual and visuo-motor tracking. It is highly sensitive to the effects of brain injury and organic decline. The Trail Making test can be used with individuals 15 years of age and older. Trails A is a good measure of pure processing speed, while Trails B is an excellent broad screening procedure for possible neuropsychological impairment. 

 

Saint Louis University Mental Status Examination (SLUMS):

 

The SLUMS is a brief oral/written exam given to people that are suspected to have dementia or Alzheimer’s Disease. The exam serves as a tool to indicate whether a doctor should consider further testing to diagnose dementia.

 

Behavior Rating Inventory of Executive Functioning – Adult (Brief-A):

The BRIEF-A is is a measure of executive functioning in adults. There are 9 scales: Inhibit, Self-Monitor, Plan/Organize, Shift, Initiate, Task Monitor, Emotional Control, Working Memory, and Organization of Materials. It is useful for a wide variety of developmental, systemic, neurological, and psychiatric disorders such as attention disorders, learning disabilities, autism spectrum disorders, traumatic brain injury, multiple sclerosis, depression, mild cognitive impairment, dementias, and schizophrenia.

Parenting

 

Child Abuse Potential Inventory (CAPI):

 

The CAPI is a screening tool for the detection of physical child abuse. There are 3 validity scales: Lie, Random Response, and Inconsistency. An elevated Abuse Scale score indicates the examinee has characteristics like those of known, active physical child abusers. The Abuse Scale can be further divided into six risk factors for the physical abuse of children: Distress, Rigidity, Unhappiness, Problems with Child and Self, Problems with Family, and Problems with Others.

 

Adult Adolescent Parenting Inventory – version 2.1 (AAPI2):

 

The AAPI2 is designed to assess the parenting and child-rearing attitudes of adolescent and adult parent populations. Based on the known parenting and child-rearing behaviors of abusive parents, responses to the inventory provide an index of risk for parenting behaviors known to be attributable to child abuse and neglect. The five parenting attitudes and behaviors assessed include expectations of children, parental empathy towards children’s needs, use of corporal punishment, parent-child family roles, and children’s power and independence. 

​© 2017 by Kranz Psychological Services, PLLC